"We purchased an older house that had old wood paneling with thick smeary texture over it. Kevin and team came in, ripped it all out, and put up nice clean new drywall for us in the living room, hallway, and kitchen. His team was very attentive to detail, and made sure we were happy with the results. We very specifically did NOT want the kind of globby crow's feet texture that can happen when too much mud is applied. On texture day they gave us a few sample texture levels to choose from to make sure we were on the same page. He even came back a day after the job was done to add the perfecting finishing touches and fix a couple tiny things we'd noticed. I would definitely reach out to Kevin again."
To get at the nails in the board above, shove a flat pry bar up under it and gently pry the board outward. In most cases, this will pop up the nailhead, so you can pull it with your hammer claw. If you run into a stubborn nail that won’t move easily, don’t use brute force and risk splitting the good board. Instead, slip a hacksaw blade behind the siding and cut the nail (Photo 2).You can’t get the new board in unless you pull the remaining shank of the cut nail (Photo 3).
Here is where this affects you as a consumer. You select a painter with a contract that says 2 coats, $500 down. You give the company the deposit and pick your colors a couple of days before the project starts. The painter goes to the store with your colors and figures out they are deep base. He (or she) not only needs to charge you more for the paint, but he also needs to charge you for a dark gray primer coat. Ninety nine percent of the time that primer coat is going to be really, really expensive since you already gave a deposit.
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