I'm an architect and my firm routinely specifies interior finishes for projects so I thought I'd contribute a professional's perspective on the issue of how many coats of paint are deemed "acceptable". The fact of the matter is the average consumer usually isn't a paint expert and can't be expected to know about all the factors that impact coverage. That knowledge is considered "means and methods" and in a court of law, the responsibility lies with the painter or general contractor, not the consumer. What the consumer should be concerned about is the final result-does it look good and is it what you expected? The simplest way to communicate this to your painter is to stipule in your written agreement that the number of coats will be "as required to cover". That way all the guess work about what kind of primer, how many coats, how color affects the scope of work, etc., is removed from the consumer's responsibility and resides where it belongs-with the professional. In the contract that's why retention is always a good idea-typically 10% is withheld from payment until the job is completed to the satisfaction of the customer. Of course in return you as the customer have to be reasonable about what constitutes a completed job. Just my $.02. http://youtube.com/v/b6_WEt9k_Hw?version=3
Lap marks are those ugly stripes caused by uneven layers of paint buildup. They occur when you roll over paint that’s already partly dry. (In warm, dry conditions, latex paint can begin to stiffen in less than a minute!) The key to avoiding lap marks  when doing DIY wall painting is to maintain a “wet edge,” so each stroke of your roller overlaps the previous stroke before the paint can begin to dry.
You know you want to hire a professional to paint your house, but you don’t know where to start. You want to make sure you’re hiring the best painting contractor around, so you do what most people today do when looking for a service: go to the Internet. But with so many options, how do you know which is the right one? Here are six easy steps to finding a local painting contractor.
Primer/Paint: “The whole industry is shifting to combination primer and paint,” says Mauro. “That’s a good thing, since a lot of people skip the primer, and the combination is better than nothing.” Still, for an unfinished or problem surface, he always uses a stand-alone primer. And if he’ll be using a dark paint, he tints the primer with about 80% of the paint color to ensure that two topcoats will do the job.

Use spray paint to refinish your old bicycle or give any surface a new finish - glitter, mirror or just a new solid color. A fresh coat of concrete paint on a basement walls can make a huge difference. Protect your garage floors from dirt and stains with an epoxy paint. Don’t forget your bookshelves — douse them with some furniture paint to make them look new, again. https://youtube.com/embed/b6_WEt9k_Hw
On the other hand, there are many homeowners who don’t know where to start when choosing a paint color. Do I want a safe, neutral color, or something more bright and inviting? No matter where you are on the spectrum of choosing a paint color, there are a few questions you should ask yourself that will help you choose the best color for your painting project.

wall Painting Ideas For Home


If you're going to do any part of the painting or prep work on your own, you must know that the first step in preparing a surface is washing it. Since dirt can affect the smoothness of a surface area -- and therefore paint's adhesion to it -- use soap to remove any dirt or stains. Make sure there's no soap left on the walls when you're finished; also make sure to remove any gloss with sandpaper and vacuum up the leftover dust.

Research the licensing requirements for your area. These laws governing professional contractor work will be different depending on where you live. It’s important to be aware of these laws and what they mean from the outset. Contact the licensing board for your state or district to find out more about what you’ll need to do to get your business off the ground.

how Much To Paint Contractor

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